Why publicly sharing traumatic events is very frequently though not always a poor choice

Revisiting a situation can partly drain a situation of emotional impact thereby achieving a catharsis. In counseling terrible events can be revisited whereby terrible events can be partly drained of emotional impact thereby achieving a catharsis. Given traumatic events the goal will very frequently not to be to wipe these events from recall. Various lessons are learned from traumatic events. However, continuously revisiting the events, which can occur given traumatic events are publicly announced, will lead to the events becoming murky and lessons to be learned will not be clear leading to a double trauma. A terrible murky situation is then always overhanging days from which no lessons were learned.

Individuals in therapy attempting to get right about what such individuals ‘profoundly emotionally desire’ only leads to very murky, very troubling situations for individuals where no lessons are learned. Individuals in therapy attempting to get right about what such individuals ‘profoundly emotionally desire’ are drawn to answers that vengeances must be taken on other individuals.

Lessons learned from traumatic events are synecdoches for such traumatic events rather than such lessons being mirrorings of traumatic events. Lessons learned from traumatic events must be sensible, however, what other individuals perhaps could hold to be undue saliences are given to adhering to such lessons. Adhering to the lessons delivers more than only the direct benefits of adhering to the lessons, the lessons appropriately fit with how individuals are acting currently though very frequently the lessons are not the speediest ways to proceed, however, as such lessons are synecdoche for traumatic events how individuals currently act fit with histories of individuals, histories that were learned from by individuals.

Sometimes traumatic events must be detailed publicly. For example, in court sometimes traumatic events must be detailed so judges and juries can make appropriate decisions. Frequently there are situations where public disclosure of bare facts of traumatic situations is appropriate. Avoiding as much is feasible the public recalling of traumatic events other than disclosure of bare facts of traumatic events, as is appropriate in various situations, does not in any way demand that public actions not be taken to prevent similar traumatic events from occurring. Women who had breast cancer, for example, frequently raise funds for breast cancer research though such women must research charities before doing so.

Lessons learned from traumatic events are unique to individuals. Such lessons can not be learned in therapy. Individuals giving counseling would basically stand out of the way given such lessons were detailed in counseling sessions.

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